William Reinsch

William Reinsch holds the Scholl Chair in International Business at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) and is a senior adviser at Kelley, Drye & Warren LLP. Previously, he served for 15 years as president of the National Foreign Trade Council, where he led efforts in favor of open markets, in support of the Export-Import Bank and Overseas Private Investment Corporation, against unilateral sanctions, and in support of sound international tax policy, among many issues. From 2001 to 2016, he concurrently served as a member of the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review Commission. He is also an adjunct assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Public Policy, teaching courses in globalization, trade policy, and politics.

Reinsch also served as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Export Administration during the Clinton administration. Prior to that, he spent 20 years on Capitol Hill, most of them as senior legislative assistant to the late Senator John Heinz (R-PA) and subsequently to Senator John D. Rockefeller IV (D-WV). He holds a B.A. and an M.A. in international relations from the Johns Hopkins University and the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies respectively.

Little Evidence Supporting the Argument About Limiting the Patent Holder’s Right to Select the Licensing Level

Gregor Langus & Vilen Lipatov In our new paper ‘Efficient level of SEPs licensing’, we examine the question whether a patent holder should be allowed to choose the level in the value chain at which to offer to license its standard essential patents (SEPs). SEPs are patents
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On the Timing of ETSI Disclosures Summary

The question of timing when companies disclose their patents as being essential to practice industry standards, such as 4G and 5G, has been recently discussed in several high-profile legal disputes. Some implementers have argued that disclosures made after the “Freeze Date”— the date when new features are no longer added
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Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy

B. Zorina Khan’s seminal work, Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy, dissects the innovation policies of key industrial nations during the First and Second Industrial Revolutions — periods of historic levels of invention and creativity. The author seeks to provide insights for determining the
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