Rama Elluru

Rama G. Elluru is currently a Senior Director at the Special Competitive Studies Project (SCSP), a non-profit, funded by Eric and Wendy Schmidt and established to make recommendations to strengthen America’s long-term competitiveness for a future where artificial intelligence (AI) and other emerging technologies reshape our national security, economy, and society.  Previous to the SCSP, she was a Director at the National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI), an independent Commission established by Congress to consider the methods and means to advance the development of AI, ML, and associated technologies to address the national security and defense needs of the United States.  She was detailed to the NSCAI from the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), where she served as an Administrative Patent Judge on the Patent Trial and Appeal.  Before joining the USPTO, Rama practiced IP law for 20 years, particularly in analyzing and litigating E.E. and bio-pharma patents. She graduated from Trinity University with a B.S. in Computer Science/Philosophy and obtained a J.D. from the Washington and Lee School of Law. After law school, she received a M.S. in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology from Georgetown University.

Assessing the Patent and Trademark Office’s Inventorship Guidance for AI-Assisted Inventions

By Alexander Kersten As new applications of artificial intelligence (AI) become more sophisticated, AI tools are increasingly used to assist in the process of invention. However, given that inventorship is limited to natural persons under U.S. law, AI’s growing utilization has raised questions around whether AI-assisted inventions should receive patents,
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Securing IP and the Future of Pandemic Preparedness

By Jeffrey Depp In December 2021, member states of the World Health Organization (WHO) at a Special Session of the World Health Assembly created an intergovernmental negotiating body (INB) to draft and negotiate a WHO convention, agreement, or other international instrument on pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response (“Pandemic Agreement”). The
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The Use of March-In Rights Could Undermine Innovation and National Security

By Hideki Tomoshige and Sujai Shivakumar By accelerating new products to market, the nation’s innovation system—a network of interconnected activities across university researchers, small and large businesses, and venture capital and other financial organizations, among other actors—enhances economic growth, competitiveness, and national security. Securing the future of this innovation system
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