Greg Raleigh

Greg joined NEA in 2017 where he focuses on investments in the technology sector. Greg has founded three successful companies, is the inventor of technology at the heart of today’s wireless phone and service industries, and has over 25 years of executive experience in several technology sectors including networking, cloud software, consumer services, wireless and military systems.

After a successful early career as an engineering executive, Greg returned to Stanford University where he discovered modern MIMO radio communication theory and invented MIMO OFDM to bridge his theory to practice. Greg then founded Clarity Wireless to commercialize this technology, which is now used in all 4G and 5G wireless devices and networks, serving billions of consumers and business users. Clarity was acquired by Cisco Systems in 1999. Following Cisco, Greg founded his second company Airgo Networks, acquired by Qualcomm in 2007. Airgo’s chipset products improved the speed and reliability of Wi-Fi by ten-fold, leading to adoption of its technology as the core of all Wi-Fi radio standards since 2006. Greg is also the founder and Managing Board Director of Headwater Research, an incubator that develops mobile operating system and cloud technology that underpins today’s mobile phone and app industries. Greg holds over 400 issued US and international patents in several fields.

Little Evidence Supporting the Argument About Limiting the Patent Holder’s Right to Select the Licensing Level

Gregor Langus & Vilen Lipatov In our new paper ‘Efficient level of SEPs licensing’, we examine the question whether a patent holder should be allowed to choose the level in the value chain at which to offer to license its standard essential patents (SEPs). SEPs are patents
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On the Timing of ETSI Disclosures Summary

The question of timing when companies disclose their patents as being essential to practice industry standards, such as 4G and 5G, has been recently discussed in several high-profile legal disputes. Some implementers have argued that disclosures made after the “Freeze Date”— the date when new features are no longer added
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Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy

B. Zorina Khan’s seminal work, Inventing Ideas: Patents, Prizes, and the Knowledge Economy, dissects the innovation policies of key industrial nations during the First and Second Industrial Revolutions — periods of historic levels of invention and creativity. The author seeks to provide insights for determining the
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